A Date is a Date is a Date

Some documents have several dates associated with them. Make certain that you clearly indicate what each date is.

A deed may have a date of signing, a date of acknowledgement, and a date of recording.

A will may have a date of signing and a date that it was proven in court.

There is the official census date and the date on which the actual census was taken.

Record the dates as specifically as you can. This can reduce confusion.

© Michael John Neill, “Genealogy Tip of the Day,” http://genealogytipoftheday.blogspot.com, 7 Oct 2012.

Recording the Execution of the Acknowledgement

A recorded deed in a county record office may have several different dates attached to it:

  • the date of execution–when it was signed.
  • the date of acknowledgement–when it was acknowledged.
  • the date of recording–when it was recorded.

There is a difference to these dates and in some cases all three may be the same, but the execution happens first, then the acknowledgement, then the recording. In some instances the recorded copy might not mention all three dates.

© Michael John Neill, “Genealogy Tip of the Day,” http://genealogytipoftheday.blogspot.com, 11 Jul 2012.

Turn the Page

When a document is located on a relative, look at the pages before and after the document for additional references to your relative. Deeds sometimes get recorded in “batches,” when it is realized that they were forgotten. Children sometimes get baptized in groups when a minister finally arrives or someone decides it is time.

And occasionally there is a supplemental death certificate when a correction needs to be made.

Indexes will take you to a direct, exact page. It’s up to you to turn a few pages before and after that page to see if there’s an additional find.

© Michael John Neill, “Genealogy Tip of the Day,” http://genealogytipoftheday.blogspot.com, 3 Sep 2012.

Old Kentucky Entries and Deeds: a Complete Index to All of the Earliest Land Entries, Military Warrants, Deeds and Wills of the Commonwealth of Kentucky

Old Kentucky Entries and Deeds: a Complete Index to All of the Earliest Land Entries, Military Warrants, Deeds and Wills of the Commonwealth of Kentuckyby Willard Rouse Jillson, Sc.D.

Review by Lynda Peach
Published November 2011Woman working a manual printing press.
About the book & Its Table of Contents
~ from Foreword

“This volume is … a complete index to these old manuscript records and is designed as a source book for the use of historical workers generally, land title attorneys, abstract clerks, genealogists and others who may find interest in the first documents pertaining to the land in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

Willard Rouse Jillson
Old State Capital
Frankfort, Kentucky
February 1, 1926
I Old Kentucky Entries and Deeds
II Lincoln Entries (1779-1787
III Fayette Entries (1782-1794)
IV Jefferson Entries (1779-1785
V Military Warrants (1782-1793
VI Military Entries (1784-1797
VII Court of Appeals, Deeds – Grantee (1783-1846)
VIII Court of Appeals, Deeds – Grantee (1783-1846)
IX Court of Appeals, Deeds – Wills (1769-1850)
X Court of Appeals, Deeds – Attorneys (1781-1853)
Example: Data from Chapter IV, Jefferson Entries, page 269.
Name Acres Book Page Entry Date Watercourses Notes
Pearman, Samuel, heirs 1,000 A 104 5-27-1780 Dicks R Withdrawn
Pearman, Samuel, heirs 1,000 A 348 3-27-1784 Salts R
Pearman, Samuel, heirs 1,000 A 348 3-27-1784 Wilsons Cr. Surveyed
Example: Data from Chapter V, Military Warrants, page 353.
Name Acres Warrant Service Date
Pearman, Harrison 200 1658 During war soldier Virginia line 8-23-1783
Pearman, Thomas 200 2595 End of war soldier Virginia line 2-23-1784

 


The edition at the Nichols Memorial Library is a 1969 reprint of the 1926 original.
The 1969 edition was published by the Genealogical Publishing Company.

Book Shelf.This book and many others like it are available for you to research onsite at the Nichols Memorial Library.