Category «How To’s, Hints & Tips»

Genealogy & Halloween

A Genealogy Tree At Halloween. Boo!

An Idea for YOUR Genealogy & Halloween

Write a memory or several memories of going Trick or Treatin’ when you were a child. If the memory is a good one & your children or grandchildren are small, share the memory with them. NOW!

If the memory is not so wonderful, write it anyway and share with your children or older grandchildren.

For A Genealogy Halloween Story example, click on the Read More…

The 1950 Census Questionnaire

The 1940 census had questions not asked on previous censuses. The site Census.Gov has the actual census used in 1950. Take a look at what is asked in the 1950 census. Like the 1940 census, extra questions are asked for a “sample” household. One of my favorite questions from the 1940 census was what grade …

No Kids, Never Had Siblings, and Died With Some Cash

Is there a relative who never had any children of their own, had no siblings and died owning enough property to require a probate or an estate settlement?

If so, the records of that settlement may be particularly interesting. The deceased person’s heirs-at-law typically would have been their first cousins or their first cousin’s descendants. Even if there was a will, these heirs-at-law typically would have had to have been notified of the probate. Those records could help determine relationships and indicate where people were living at the time the relative died.

These estate or probate records would typically be filed at the local court level.

© Michael John Neill, “Genealogy Tip of the Day,” http://genealogytipoftheday.blogspot.com, 6 Sep 2012.

Enumerated Twice in a Census?

Depending on their family and work situation, there is a chance that an ancestor is enumerated more than once in a census. The census was not necessarily always taken “on just one day,” so individuals who moved around the time of the census may have been listed by two enumerators. Individuals who were living in one household and working as domestic help in another may show up in twice–once in each household.

© Michael John Neill, “Genealogy Tip of the Day,” http://genealogytipoftheday.blogspot.com, 22 Jun 2012.

State Institution?

Was your ancestor institutionalized for a short time or for the last few years of their life? If so, they might have died a distance from where they actually lived. Records of the actual institution may be closed, but there might be local court records of the institutionalization. People who were sent to institutions weren’t always “crazy,” but might have simply needed more care than the family could give.

And they might have been buried on the grounds of the institution–leaving no tombstone behind either.

© Michael John Neill, “Genealogy Tip of the Day,” http://genealogytipoftheday.blogspot.com, 29 Aug 2012.