Category «Library Book Reviews»

Mary (Elise) Mason’s Scrapbook

Mary (Elise) Mason’s Scrapbook ~ compiled by Limestone County Historical Society, April 2010

Review published March 2012Lady at manual printing press - Genealogy
About the book
~ from Preface

“Miss Mary E. Mason developed a comprehensive scrapbook that resulted in a significant historical data base for Athens and Limestone County. This scrapbook was developed in seven volumes roughly organized by subject. … Most of the material in these volumes are newspaper clippings … [they were] turning dark and [were] very fragile. The binders that contain these were literally falling apart. This fragile condition did not lend them to access to the public. … The original material had no index; only a limited topic list for each volume was included at the beginning of each volume. A detailed index was developed for four of the volumes … [then this 2010 publication includes] an index for those volumes not previously indexed …″

~ from Subject Table

Subjects listed are:
» Business
» Railroads
» Schools
» Legal
» Newspapers
» Postal Service
» Civil War
» Gov. Officials
» Health Care
» Athens College
» Activities/Events
» Churches
» Municipal
» Residents
» Early History
» General History
» Homes
» Deaths & Obituaries
——————————–
» And a list of contents included that are Outside Limestone County

Table of Contents:

Volume 1
Early History, Homes, General History, Families, Social and Community Activities, Municipal Activities.

Volume 2
Churches, doctors, Legal Profession, Newspapers

Volume 3
Historic Homes, Residents, Civil War Memories, Belle Mina, Mooresville, Decatur, Country Club, Railroad, County Fair, Local Society

Volume 4
Community Leaders, Deaths and Obituaries, Local DAR, Early History

Volume 5
Athens Progress, Athens College, Local Schools

Volume 6
Civil War Memories, Residents and Personalities, Events, Bibb Home, Decatur and Lawrence County

Volume 7
Drinking Fountain, The Springs, Rest Room, Bass Tablet, Masonic Corner Stone, Post Office, City Hall, Bakery, Fire Company, Bus Station, Hospital, L & N

 


NEAGS Reviewer Comments

Miss Mary Mason was a historic leader not just in Limestone County but in all of Alabama. The amount of material she compiled is amazing.

A hand-written note from her states regret that she did not start the scrapbook earlier because those who had affected the county & area had already passed.

Many pictures from newspapers are included as well as copies of other images that Miss Mason obtained or had in her personal collection.

Note: Which newspapers the clippings came from is not always rarely shown. Dates are not always available either. But that does not lessen the value of these seven volumes.

Some Excerpts …

Kegley’s Virginia Frontier – The Beginning of the Southwest, The Roanoke of Colonial Days 1740-1783 w/Maps & Illustrations

Kegley’s Virginia Frontier – The Beginning of the Southwest, The Roanoke of Colonial Days 1740-1783 with Maps and Illustrationsby F. B. Kegley

 

Review published December 2011Lady at manual printing press - Genealogy
About the book & Its Table of Contents
~ from The Sponsors

“In the History of the American Frontier no little section in the entire country deserves more attention than does the region drained by the upper branches of the James River and the Roanoke in Virginia. From the beginning of the Colony this region was the goal of many exploring excursions, and the period of transmontane[1] settlement it was the center of political, social and military activities. …

Mr. Kegley’s painstaking compilation will be highly interesting and will be invaluable as a reference work on the early movements to explore and settle the country and on the lives of the setters as they became established in their pioneer homes and settlements.

Jos. A. Turner, President
Southwest Virginia Historical Society
April 17, 1937
I The Virginia Frontier from the Beginning of the Colony to the Year 1740
II New Frontier Advances, 1740-1760
III The Southwest Frontier in the French and Indian War
IV The Settlements, 1760-1770
V Community Development in Botetourt County 1770-1783
Maps: 31 excellent maps such as The Original Shires of Virginia, Contemporary Frontier Settlements, 1740-1760 and the Virginia Frontier, 1756.
Illustrations: 66 are provided. Think of ‘illustrations’ as being copies of documents or pictures of associated data such as Items from Washington’s Expense Account or Detail of Structure–Garst House.

 

Example: Data from Part V Chapter Fifteen, Community Building on the Roanoke, I. The Buffalo Creek Community, Changes in land ownership.

August 19, 1790 Jacob Coffman–960 acres pound sign1,350, by deed from Anthony Gohlson and Elizabeth, adjoining Thomas Madison, Kinsey and Robert Harvey. ~ from page 494

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

“Green Spring” and “Cloverdale”
Rev. Caleb Wallace married Rosanna Christian who had received several tractys of land from her father, Israel christian, and had entered others in her name. Their home place was on Little Buffalo Creek on land adjoining the lower part of the Breckenridge estate. They called their home “Green Spring” and James Breckenridge called his plantation built up by Jacob Coffman, Samuel G. Adams and Carter Beverley. ~ from page 511

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Some Marriages of Interest in the Tinker Creek–Glade Creek-Great Lick Community in Early Botetourt

1803. Jacob Coffman and Anne Ames. ~ from page 541

The three entries indicated in the index for Jacob Coffman.

Extensive Index

This book has an extensive index: 221 pages with contents having 674 pages. When checking the index, be sure to look for alternate spellings of the surname. For example, Valentine SEVIER has two entries in the index but the surname is spelled SEVEAR as well as SEVIER.


[1] Definition of transmontane: On or coming from the other side of the mountains; ‘the transmontane section of the state’.

 


The edition at the Nichols Memorial Library is copy number 1627 of the third printing of the first edition. Publication date 1928 by the Southwest Virginia Historical Society.

 

Book shelf
This book and many others like it are available for you to research onsite at the Nichols Memorial Library.

 

 

 

Old Kentucky Entries and Deeds: a Complete Index to All of the Earliest Land Entries, Military Warrants, Deeds and Wills of the Commonwealth of Kentucky

Old Kentucky Entries and Deeds: a Complete Index to All of the Earliest Land Entries, Military Warrants, Deeds and Wills of the Commonwealth of Kentuckyby Willard Rouse Jillson, Sc.D.

Review published November 2011Lady at manual printing press - Genealogy
About the book & Its Table of Contents
~ from Foreword

“This volume is … a complete index to these old manuscript records and is designed as a source book for the use of historical workers generally, land title attorneys, abstract clerks, genealogists and others who may find interest in the first documents pertaining to the land in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

Willard Rouse Jillson
Old State Capital
Frankfort, Kentucky
February 1, 1926
I Old Kentucky Entries and Deeds
II Lincoln Entries (1779-1787
III Fayette Entries (1782-1794)
IV Jefferson Entries (1779-1785
V Military Warrants (1782-1793
VI Military Entries (1784-1797
VII Court of Appeals, Deeds – Grantee (1783-1846)
VIII Court of Appeals, Deeds – Grantee (1783-1846)
IX Court of Appeals, Deeds – Wills (1769-1850)
X Court of Appeals, Deeds – Attorneys (1781-1853)
Example: Data from Chapter IV, Jefferson Entries, page 269.
Name Acres Book Page Entry Date Watercourses Notes
Pearman, Samuel, heirs 1,000 A 104 5-27-1780 Dicks R Withdrawn
Pearman, Samuel, heirs 1,000 A 348 3-27-1784 Salts R
Pearman, Samuel, heirs 1,000 A 348 3-27-1784 Wilsons Cr. Surveyed
Example: Data from Chapter V, Military Warrants, page 353.
Name Acres Warrant Service Date
Pearman, Harrison 200 1658 During war soldier Virginia line 8-23-1783
Pearman, Thomas 200 2595 End of war soldier Virginia line 2-23-1784

 


The edition at the Nichols Memorial Library is a 1969 reprint of the 1926 original. The 1969 edition was published by the Genealogical Publishing Company.

Book shelf
This book and many others like it are available for you to research onsite at the Nichols Memorial Library.

Well, I’ve Never Met a Native – Stories of the Coastal People of Alabama

Well, I’ve Never Met a Native ~ Stories of the Coastal People of Alabama – by Joy Callaway Buskens

Review published February 2012Lady at manual printing press - Genealogy
About the book
~ from About the Author

“One of her biggest credentials for writing her book is that she is either kin to all the native families or knows them. … The book is a record of the experiences of the people who have lived in this area.”

~ from Introduction

My husband1 … was very critical of the stories as he said they skipped around too much but I have decided to write them just like they were told to me so there are several accounts of the 1906 hurricane and there are ‘repeat’ stories in several chapters. …

Most of the stories have the names of the people I talked to. I picked the oldest natives I could think of and they gave me a wealth of information. …

I have included some family recipes as well as old sayings or poems and places of events and historical significance.

I know a lot of this information is not in correct grammatical English but I put it down the way people in the south talk and I like the mannerisms and way of talking each one had. …

I have tried to put all the names in capital letters so they will stand out when you read the page. There are over 700 names mentioned

Joy Callaway Buskens
» A map of the area starts the book right after the Table of Contents. The latter lists the various stories.» Next is a long list of Pictures Used in Well I’ve Never Met a Native such as a Grocery order from early 1900’s, Aerial view of Gulf Shores after 1947 hurricane, as well as some of the people and their families.

» An extensive list of the Names of Places and Events (not in alphabetical order).

» The book includes an Index of Names with associated page numbers. Names are in alphabetical order by surname but not in the traditional Lastname, Firstname format.


NEAGS Reviewer CommentsAs the author stated in her Introduction, the book is written just the way it was told to her and I believe in the order she obtained the information. This does make the book jump around in time & place, but that is part of the book’s charm. Even if your family is not part of the 700 names, if they lived in this area of Alabama reading Well, I’ve Never Met a Native will give you a great living picture of their life.

The entries, including some pictures, of the hurricanes of 1906 and 1947 are gripping. Remember that you will not find these together. They are scattered through the book.

Note: The author provides ‘source’ information at times but not consistently nor in a genealogical approved format.

Some Excerpts …

p. 86 “… the COBURN school was built out of Deal (fir or pine lumber) wood, called Dunnage now. It was 4 x 4 inch piece of wood that was found on the beach. It was from ships passing in the area. It separated the cargo so the water could pass between the cargo if it got rough. It was used to stack and separate the cargo …”

p. 90 “… Mrs. EMMA said the schools back then were nothing like they are now. They had water in a bucket that they first had to pump and they had a dipper they all drank from.2 …”

p. 144 has a great list of Teacher Rules such as “You may not loiter downtown in ice cream stores.” Or “You must wear at least two petticoats.”

p. 166 begins a list of Oyster Facts and p. 168 has facts on Crabs.

p. 187 “That was in the days of feed sack dresses.3 … We would get to pick the pieces we wanted and then [Mom] would work hard and usually make twin outfits for me and my little sister …”

p. 198 under a section called Mrs. Eva Walker Holk — One of the Earliest Settlers Mrs. Holk talks about leaving Florida area after homesteading. [The Homestead Act was in 1862; it is not clear whether this is time period or not.] The quote though is amazingly accurate for today.

You couldn’t sell anything for nothing

“They did not buy their land but homesteaded it. when they got ready to leave three years later, they almost gave the land away. That was when the Florida boom busted. ‘The bottom fell out. At first everyone wanted to buy land in Florida and not in Alabama. When the bottom fell out, you couldn’t sell anything for nothing,‘ she said.”

 


1 Later in the Introduction the author states her husband also got her a typewriter, camera, & tape recorder encouraging her to do something she really wanted to do.

2 If you are interested in one-room country schools, see One-Room Country School Memories on this site. I went to such a school as a child & we did indeed drink from the same dipper.

3 The author doesn’t say but my childhood feed sack dresses were from chicken feed. I did not have a little sister but my mother would often make a doll dress to match mine.

The edition at the Nichols Memorial Library is a 1986 signed original published by Quill Publications, Columbus, Georgia.

Book shelf
This book and many others like it are available for you to research onsite at the Nichols Memorial Library.